Crop Rotation

(Jamie) Welcome back to Farm Factor and the Kansas Soybean Report.
(Greg) This is the Kansas Soybean Update. It’s brought to you by the Kansas Soybean Commission. The Soybean Checkoff, Progress Powered by Kansas Farmers. Jeff Vogel, Plant Protection and Weed Control Program Manager with the Kansas Department of Agriculture is joining us. And for soybean growers, Jeff, one of the big things they’re probably looking at, especially to help disease control out in their fields, is looking at crop rotation. And they’re gonna have to start planning for that for 2016. (Jeff) That’s correct, you know rotation is a very important part of an integrated pest management program to manage plant diseases. But really to get the most benefit out of rotation there are some additional considerations to think about. Rotation, at least for part of disease management works with diseases that are soil borne, or built up inoculum in the soil under continuous cropping situations. But it does not work with diseases that are blown up from the south. An example of that common one is the wheat leaf rot that gets blown up from the south as wheat matures. Rotation would not be able to manage that type of disease if you were considering it. (Greg) Soybean rust would probably be another example as well. (Jeff) Most definitely. When we think about rotation, you know we must also start thinking about rotating into a crop that is not related. For example if you were in soybeans, looking at a non-legume type crop, or kind of thinking about something that is unrelated. Grain sorghum, the forage sorghum would not be advisable if you’re looking at that, but it just has to be a different type crop species so that the same disease will not serve as a host for both species. (Greg) So, let’s turn that around the other way, would that kind of work the same way if next year, you want to put a field into soybeans, on how you approach that? (Jeff) If you’re considering soybean rotation into soybeans, there’s a couple soil borne diseases you could consider. One of them is soybean cyst nematode, but really looking at the literature, could consider multiple years of non-soybean crops, really provide the best benefit as far as reducing the populations in the field. Phytophthora root rot is something if you rotate into soybeans if you didn’t have soybeans in the previous year, you could help manage that disease. (Greg) The bottom line for that Kansas farmer, really need to be proactive in how they look at this? (Jeff) Most definitely, I think planning ahead and thinking about rotation is important to manage diseases, but I do want to step back and say be careful with some rotations. For example corn, followed by wheat sometimes can increase the head scab incidence because the same disease is present in both crops. (Greg) Alright Jeff, we appreciate your time, thank you very much. (Jeff) Thank you. (Greg) That’s Jeff Vogel, Plant Protection and Weed Control Program Manager with the Kansas Department of Agriculture. He’s been our guest on the Kansas Soybean Update. It’s brought to you by the Kansas Soybean Commission. The Soybean Checkoff, Progress Powered by Kansas Farmers. Learn more at kansassoybeans.org. For Kansas Soybeans, I’m Greg Akagi.
(Jamie) Hope you enjoyed this week’s Kansas Soybean Report. Stay tuned for Duane’s visit with a longtime livestock exhibitor in the Dairy Barn.

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