Ignacio – Picking the right Apps

(Conrad) Good morning and welcome to Farm Factor on AGam in Kansas. I’m your host Conrad Kabus. With many of us using apps in everyday life, it only makes sense that farmers should use apps on their operation. Take a look. Recently AGam in Kansas caught up with Kansas State Agronomy at the Kansas Farm Bureau Annual Meeting in Manhattan to discuss new apps the department is looking at for farmers. (Ignacio) So my name is Dr. Ignacio Ciampitti. I am a Cropping System, Cropping Production Specialist at Kansas State University in the Department of Agronomy. And I was here at the Kansas Farm Bureau Annual Convention Meeting just to talk about apps in agriculture. (Conrad) There are many categories K-State is looking to help farmers in including economic, livestock and calculator apps. (Ignacio) Basically at this moment we are exploring different apps from different sections. So, we have a kind of different categories from identification apps that we call the ID apps, calculator apps, basically those are the apps that we can use to make calculations. We have some other apps that we call the corporal action apps that we can use for example to make decisions in the field about crops like corn, sorghum and soybeans. We have economic apps that basically we are using the ones to take a look to the future price, the markets. We have some other apps that we call also the livestock apps. We have apps that we can use just to manage the cattle and take a look at some of the arrangements in the field and just to find the best price for corn prices and for cattle prices around the state. And then the last one that usually identifies also is what basically the general knowledge app. Those are the ones that basically we use every day. I mean the weather apps or google apps, and any kind of different apps. (Conrad) Thank you for watching. We’ll be right back after the break. (Conrad) Good morning and welcome to Farm Factor on AGam in Kansas. I’m your host, Conrad Kabus. With many of us using apps in everyday life it only makes sense that farmers should use apps on their operation. Take a look. Recently AGam in Kansas caught up with Kansas State Agronomy at the Kansas Farm Bureau Annual Meeting in Manhattan to discuss new apps the department is looking at for farmers. (Ignacio) We are applying to make a second, I mean revision of the first publication that we released this year around March. And now we’re e-updates K-State Department of Agronomy. So, we are applying to a second one this Friday, the next coming Friday on the second week of December 2014. The idea is trying to revise this content every six months to try to gain some kind of a fresh view of all the new and different apps that are coming into the field and for farmers. K-State is working on an app that could help producers around the state in their grain sorghum operation to help determine how many grains are in crops heads. (Ignacio) We are trying right to work in a new app coming from K-State that we are developing here in my group. The idea of the app is trying to get some idea how to estimate sorghum yields. And when you are talking about corn and soybeans, yield estimations are extremely easy in the sense that farmers can go out to the field and they can check the corn ears and they can just count the number of rows, number of kernels. And soybeans are very similar they can go to the field, they can count pods and they can count how many plants. When you are looking on to the same how to do estimations on sorghum yield in the field, that’s seems to be more complicated. And the problem is just based on the idea of how you can determine how many grains you have in the head. And the heads usually they have around.. between 1,000 to 4,000 grains. But when you are looking to farmers to go out and do these estimations it gets very complicated and very cumbersome in trying to get some idea of how many grains you have in the field. (Conrad) K-State hopes to initiate this app in mid-August during heading time. (Ignacio) So all of the apps will be to see if we are going to implement the app for the next coming growing season and trying to have kind of a first version and see if we can do some estimations of sorghum yields in the field by around probably first week of August or maybe mid-August when sorghum is at the heading time So, with that idea how this app can change what farmers are performing today and they were doing in the past, I think this app can help farmers to decide what is a yield that is estimating from the field at that specific moment, kind of a heading time. And also it will help farmers to decide if they need to continue with a crop, if they need to probably follow the crop until harvest, or if they can probably just take all the crop and introduce a new crop into a rotation. So, it will probably help farmers to make management decisions of really seeing how much yield are they getting from that crop and how probably to follow up as a consequence crop.

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