Soybean Update with Ignacio Ciampitti

(Jamie) Welcome back to Farm Factor and the Kansas Soybean Update.
(Greg Akagi) This is the Kansas soybean update. It’s brought to you by the Kansas Soybean Commission. The Soybean Checkoff, Progress Powered by Kansas Farmers. Ignacio Ciampitti, K-State Crop Production and Cropping Systems Specialist joins us and Ignacio, some soybean producers have already started but many are preparing to plant their soybean crop, then it’s good for producers to get started off on the right foot as they get started planting. (Ignacio) I think that is critical, I mean, we are seeing some changes. We are moving right now to also some kind of wet pattern in the next five days and then I would say we will go rotating to dry and then wet conditions. We need to make sure we get a good soybean stand. Planting condition is one of the critical points for having a very good establishing and what I am talking about planting conditions we need to take a look to soil temperature and then we need to take a look at soil moisture. If we are going, soil temperature at this point I can say we are not having many issues like farmers are not looking to that much. We have good temperatures, more than sixty degrees in several places at four-inch soil depth. So when we are looking about main limiting factor this point is the moisture condition and then the main important message right now is planting conditions and then planting in too wet conditions that results in several different issues. Soil crusting is one and then if we have conditions like rain and very intense rain and then drying conditions those soybeans they cannot really break the soil crust and then we start having some issues about uniformity and we have poor emergence. Take a warning also about soil compaction, planting into wet conditions comes to soil compaction and that compaction also can affect soybean emergence. Another one, really pay attention to planting depths. Soybeans are really susceptible to plant insects then and then we need to very careful I mean going too deep in situations that we have so much moisture. So we need to make sure that we go not too deep in those situations because we will not have enough energy to emerge. Then some of the things we always emphasis and we are looking about planting is about the idea of making sure that we add some of our nutrients to the soybeans just to have a good start. So just keep an eye on the down pressure on the planter, keep an eye on the planting depth and uniformity. The main factor at this point Greg is the wet soil and then going into too wet conditions. We can have early systems of solving like uniformity because the plants cannot emerge, we can have also problems with insects because the seeds are staying in the soil and they’re not emerging really fast. And the last one of the soil issues is related to diseases. Early system diseases are also affecting soybeans soil. The soybeans are planted into too wet and cooler conditions and will take longer to emerge and they will be more susceptible to any potential impact disease. ((Greg) Ignacio Ciampitti, K-State Crop Production and Cropping Systems Specialist joins us at the Kansas Soybean Update, it’s brought to you by the Kansas Soybean Commission. The Soybean Checkoff, Progress Powered by Kansas Farmers. Learn more at Kansassoybeans.org. For Kansas Soybeans, I’m Greg Akagi.
(Jamie) Hope you enjoyed this week’s Kansas Soybean Update. After the break let’s join Duane and Kendal Peterson.

No Comments Yet.

Leave a reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.